Mobile Technology – Week 7

Title :The influence of technology in pop culture on curriculum and instruction: the iGeneration of children has a unique set of learning characteristics that must be taken into account when teaching

Age Group: Elementary but goes all the way up through grade 12.
As I began looking at readings for this week, the topic is so big that I had to make myself take a step back, and choose something.  I thought this article was VERY interesting, and something that all new and experienced teachers should be aware of.  Basically, the article talks about how kids of this generation are growing up in a world that is the most tech savvy the world has ever seen.  “This group of students currently entering schools may in many cases have a
greater level of technological expertise than their teachers.” (Mears) This is especially important to remember because if our kids know more than we do, that is a problem.  It’s going to get even harder and harder to stay on top of the technology world, but it’s a necessity if you want to have the respect of your students.  I think this addresses standard NETS-T 5a: Participate in local and global learning communities to explore creative applications of technology to improve student learning. This is a must.  We can’t ever stop learning!
Another standard that is addressed in this article is NETS-T 5b: Exhibit leadership by demonstrating a vision of technology infusion, participating in shared decision-making and community building, and developing the leadership and technology skills of others.  The article talks about how important is it to choose what type of technology you infuse.  One point in the article says that you may think you are putting in a fun, exciting Powerpoint presentation with animation, but really, the kids are not going to think that is “cool” because they have seen so much more than that.
This article talks so much about infusing the technology that they know and love into their learning.  Kids are bombarded with so much media everyday…Since we know that, and know how they use it, why not try to infuse it into their learning.  They are much more likely to be engaged and want to do the task that has been given to them if it is something they are comfortable with.  I think this addresses standard NETS-S5 b: Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity.  They need to use the things they love most.  We need to foster this and run with it! The article gives specific details on how to use some of these systems.
I want to highlight a few of the big points this article makes. This article talks about six specific traits that these “iGeneration” kids are growing up with that can help us in our teaching…here they are (I’m not including all of teach point):
1. They were introduced to technology at birth and have always known constant
bombardment of pop-culture trends and information via the media. They are used to information being constantly available at their fingertips. I think this addresses NETS-S 4c:Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.  Kids know how to use the technology, we need to teach them how to find and use they stuff that they need. These are skills that they will need, we need to give it to them!
2. They are advanced multitaskers who embrace any new piece of technology…
3.The virtual worlds created by video games and the social worlds created by
Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter–as well as anything they can find by “Googling” the Internet are–craved by them almost as an obsession.
4.Ensuring that they complete instructional tasks requires constant motivation and reinforcement…
5. Their parents are members of the “Net Generation” and therefore technologically advanced as well…
6. They tend to be confident in their abilities, welcome new challenges, and adapt to changes very quickly…
I could go on and on about this article…I find it very interesting, but I’m limited just a few more words here.  The last thing I am going to talk about is parent involvement.  If you look up at number 5, I think it is important to note that most parents are in this tech crazed world too.  I think that means for teachers that we need to provide them with tools that they can easily access to track their child’s education (powerschool up to date, a blog, Facebook page…etc.) I think addresses NETS-S 3b: Collaborate with students,  peers, parents, and community members using digital tools and resources to support student success and innovation.
This article hits most of the standards here, but I only highlighted the ones that I thought were most important.  Check out this article, it’s AWESOME!
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3 thoughts on “Mobile Technology – Week 7

  1. I found this review very interesting and I am intrigued to find the article and read it! I agree that students are very confident and sure in their abilities to use the technology available to them. I always find it interesting how great multi-taskers kids are. whenever i am subbing, i find that students can be doing so many things at once and are still able to follow the directions. I also agree with how technology oriented students and their parents are. the more places I go to sub, it seems that the schools are getting in contact with parents via email, the school website, Facebook or another online application.

  2. This sounds like an interesting article. I like how the main points to consider were laid out concisely. Looking at points 1-3, I can say that I would agree with this for the most part. With the current economic state, we can’t assume that all students have all the types of technology that are available, but some definitely do. Most kids from this generation either have the technology at home or have been exposed to it at friends’ homes. I would also agree that they multitask and love being able to Google anything they want to know more about or understand. It is important for teachers to try out the new technologies to remain current with what students are used to.
    On point number 4, I think motivation is important. I think having students do authentic tasks can help with motivation. As far as reinforcement, I think it is good, but sometimes if we are giving too much, it can feel contrived to students. I say that knowing however that most video games and app games do give kids a lot of reinforcement every time they get something right.

    I had a little bit of a hard time with the author’s points in number 5 & 6. I think I am reading them too literally, but I think there are some assumptions made here. I think the author is assuming that today’s parents are tech. savvy. Again, I think most are, but not all. Number 6 also assumes that kids are confident, and adapt quickly. I think most are, but even the most confident kids can have days when they feel stressed and not so confident. I think teachers have to be aware of kids that need confidence building, kids that need challenge, and kids that need pre-teaching of routines and schedules.

    I agree with the last point about parents appreciating being informed. I know as a parent, I appreciate being able to access my kid’s grades, email their teachers when necessary and catch up with class websites when available.
    Thanks for sharing the highlights. I will have to check out the full article.

  3. “kids of this generation are growing up in a world that is the most tech savvy the world has ever seen” and that isn’t going to change anytime soon, the best advice then for us teachers would be to stay with the times and not fall behind which you did mention, and I agree with you that staying with the times is “… a necessity if you want to have the respect of your students.” While we learn a great deal from our students it’s crucial we still have things to teach them if not can we really call ourselves teachers? I also liked how you said “why not try to infuse it into their learning” (it being technology that students are very attracted to). I think this is a great idea, however we still need to balance the technology time with activity time (P.E and health major here).

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